Tag Archives: Lakka

Outboards

17 Sep

Are outboards ​the bain of every liveaboard’s lifestyle? Certainly, I’ve read several blog posts bemoaning them and they all too frequently become the subject of cockpit discussions​. The dinghy is such an essential part of our boating existence, the car of the dirt dweller but with a far less reliable engine. Not only that, the engine has to be heaved on and off the boat, a task that is either back breaking or involves some sort of, often precarious, pulley system.

We thought we’d cracked it though. When we bought Desi a lovely little dinghy was included along with its outboard which happened to be electric. We’d never actually seen an electric outboard before and had certainly not considered buying one. A little wary at first, we were rapidly converted. Light to handle and with more than enough power, it also had the advantage of being rechargeable via either the mains electricity in the marinar or using the solar panels – free power! No more reliance on smelly petrol or carrying/storing noxious containers. Win, win. Until now.

Our little beauty has developed an aversion to water. You might well say that, of course, electricity and water don’t mix. But this is an outboard motor, engineered by those clever Germans, and designed to be in water as the basic function of its being. Now ours doesn’t like a bit of dew. Connections have duly been cleaned and sprayed with the German equivalent of WD-40. But a few days at anchor and we’ve had to resort to rowing ashore. And back.

Damingly, it always seems to start on testing, even happily taking us for a night out. Sorted, we thought. But no. Ironically, just as we were returning to the dinghy we got chatting to another owner, only the second we’d met, singing the praises of the motor. As we both inserted the magnetic key his started immediately. Ours – nothing. The other guy, who happened to be German himself, volunteered​ to give us a tow, saying that he felt a responsibility for his country’s engineering. We were very happy to take him up on the offer, our rowing not being the most efficient at the best of times let alone after a big meal and several drinks.

At the time of writing, cleaned and sprayed yet again, it seems to be working. Until we come to use it again?

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Let Loose

16 May

We’ve finally let go of the lazy line. Yes, the Lamputts have left the marina. Neil must have started to think that he’d have to drag me kicking and screaming from the pontoon even as I still clung onto the shore power cable. But, this time at least, my reluctance genuinely wasn’t due to losing the comforts of home.

It was still a bit blowy. Well, it was the day before to be precise and it all still looked a bit unsettled in the forecast. I know, I know, I sound pathetic but it’s experience that’s made be this way. Apart from anything else the last time we’d done this journey was the one and only time I’ve been physically sea sick. In the entire time we’ve been sailing, in all the big seas and high winds we’ve been in from Plymouth to Greece, the only time I’ve had my head in a bucket is during that short distance between the two islands of Corfu and Paxos.

We were both awake early. Truth be told, I’d been awake most of the night. Eventually, though, with every forecast known to man checked, a pile of ham rolls in the fridge, water tank refilled and a couple of Stugeron swallowed, we left the marina behind us. Once out of the bay, the sea was still a bit churned up and it was decidedly on the chilly side but I started to relax.

If you wait for the wind to drop before leaving harbour you can’t expect to sail all the way. Well, so be it. A steady 6 knots on engine and main sail would get us into Lakka just fine. OK, it’s a bit boring but at least the floor stays mostly horizontal and there’s an awful lot to be said for that. I know Neil wouldn’t entirely agree with me.

When the cork-screw motion approaching Paxos set in the meds did their work. We could see the boats at anchor in Lakka, their hulls appearing pale blue in the distance, reflection from the turquoise water of the bay. It is worth letting loose.

Ups and Downs

27 Aug

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We sat out a few days of thunderstorms in the marina. Although never a hardship for us, we were nonetheless eager to get out and about again as the weather improved. We’d both been studying the forecasts with a view to heading south to Paxos and while Neil was quite happy, I wasn’t so sure.

You see I’m a nervous sailor. Scrap that. I’m not a sailor. I’m here under completely false pretences. When real sailors come in going “Oh brilliant, great sail today. 30 knots and we were stonking along” I just think “Mad!”

The forecast was for a Force 4, perhaps the sailing ideal. Really nothing to worry about and as Neil pointed out, I can’t have it both ways. If I want a breeze to keep us cool at anchor we’ve got to actually go out when there’s some wind. He’s right, of course.

Off we went, up went the sails and off went the engine. We weren’t heeled over much, the sails cast a pleasant shadow into the cockpit and all was well with the world. Wonderful. Yes, I get it.

Soon we were anchored at the southern end of Corfu in Petriti’s large bay and for a while it looked like we were going to be the only boat there. It wasn’t long, though, before they were rolling in – and so was the swell. Not the annoying, boat-rattling swell of the ferry boats further north but the constant, all-nighter. We were bucking like a rodeo rider but, to be fair, the motion wasn’t unpleasant. It just meant that Neil didn’t get the fried eggs he was looking forward to.

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We didn’t hang about the next day and happily left the crowded bay heading for Lakka on Paxos. Lovely, lovely Lakka. Yes, it gets crowded too but we like to tie up to the rocks, providing a relatively private patch of turquoise water to swim in and the shade comes in early as the sun starts to go down.

This time, though, the last few miles were uncomfortable to say the least. I’ve often felt seasick but never actually reached the throwing up stage. It took about 10 minutes. Just writing about it now makes me feel ill and, would you believe it, a rolling swell has just started here in Lakka. I’ll be sitting next to the bucket.

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