Not All Plain Sailing

19 May

 

As I said in the previous post, the journey down to Lakka was fine, just boring which I never complain about when it comes to sailing. And the first night was lovely, free swinging in the bay. The following night, though, the swell rolled in making for a very bouncy bed but nothing to worry about and no sign of the promised thunderstorms, just a rather wet and chilly afternoon cooped up below.

It was the following night that proved to be particularly unpleasant. The day had been a perfect temperature with a pleasant enough breeze lulling us in to a false sense of security. Neil had even gone for a swim – for all of 30 seconds! We’d been for a walk, done a bit of shopping in the small village and lingered over a couple of cokes chatting to another crew who also have a berth in the same marina. The afternoon was spent lounging around reading and watching the comings and goings. This is what it’s all supposed to be about. There had been a bit of thunder and a short burst of rain but that was actually quite reassuring in that it was not an issue at all.

We’d turned in for an early night when a sudden squall hit. The first I knew about it was a howling wind giving the boat what felt like a big shove and the sudden jerk of the anchor chain as it was stretched to its fullest. All I could do was lie there rigid in bed for a few seconds, stunned and disoriented. In the meantime, Neil was up with coat on, heading up top. That finally broke the spell.

Thankfully our anchor had held but others weren’t so lucky. Everybody around us was letting out more chain which allowed us to do the same. Dinghies were somehow returning to their boats from the shore, something I really wouldn’t have relished in those conditions. That was all we could do, to be honest, but sleep was out of the question for a while as we kept watch to make sure we weren’t going to drag and nobody was going to drag into us. The wind eventually dropped as quickly as it had arrived but leaving a very churned up sea. Not a pleasant night.

So leaving the following morning, despite a bouncy sea, seemed like a good idea even to me. I’d had enough of the Northern Ionian in May but it had to have one more pop at us. Just as I was starting to enjoy the long journey down to the Lefkas Canal, flat seas and only just enough wind for the mainsail to help us along, out of nowhere we were hit on the nose by almost 30 knots of wind. With nowhere nearer to run to, we made as much headway as we could against the wind and rolling white seas. Neil gave the sail its head, heeling us over to the water line.

Five minutes before we had been lounging on the cushions eating grapes in true Bacchanalian fashion. Now we were soaked to the skin, the floor was far from horizontal and Desi was crashing down the waves in a truly sickening fashion. For three hours. Perhaps you will appreciate the relief we felt on making it into the canal close to bridge opening time. And the wind was gone. 

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4 Responses to “Not All Plain Sailing”

  1. brummytezza May 19, 2017 at 5:14 pm #

    My heart raced just reading it. Think I’ll put my Mustos on eBay! T

    • lamputts May 20, 2017 at 5:59 am #

      It wasn’t supposed to be like that this time around! A bit of a rethink might be in order…

  2. Jan May 27, 2017 at 5:52 pm #

    You do get yourselves into some interesting scrapes. Glad you are safe.

    • lamputts May 27, 2017 at 8:01 pm #

      Thanks, Jan. Wasn’t supposed to happen this time, of course…

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